Friday, July 24, 2009

LODD: Honoring Our Fallen: CA-SRF-Backbone Helibase

Honoring Our Fallen

Update: A U.S. Forest Service firefighter who died July 21 after falling about 200 feet from a helicopter during a routine rappelling exercise in Willow Creek while he was assigned to fight the Backbone Fire will be laid to rest Thursday in Hayward.

A funeral service for Thomas “T.J.” Marovich Jr., 20, is at 10:30 a.m. at St. Clement’s Catholic Church.

Following the service, there will be a walking procession of more than 500 family members, friends and firefighters along Mission Boulevard from the church to the burial site at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery.
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WILLOW CREEK, Calif. - Firefighters will be escorting the body of Thomas (TJ) Marovich Jr., on Friday July 24, 2009 to the Eureka/Arcata airport, where he then will be flown home to the Bay area and transported to Hayward. Marovich incurred fatal injuries this past Tuesday during a routine rappel training exercise while assigned to the Backbone fire.

The procession will begin at 1:15 pm from the Bayshore Mall in Eureka, CA. The procession will be turning left onto Broadway merging onto Highway 101 to the Arcata/ Eureka airport located in Mckinleyville, CA.

The California Highway Patrol, fire engines from the Six Rivers, Modoc and Lassen National Forests, as well as CalFire, will take part in the escort. Other official Forest Service, State and local emergency service vehicles are taking part. Out of honor to our fallen firefighter, the public is asked to observe a moment of silence as the procession goes by.

Note to Media: The Honor Guard will be at the airport
Fire Information: 530-629-2816
Email: backbone.fire.info@gmail.com
www.inciweb.org/incident/1716/

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