Twitter Buttons

Saturday, June 30, 2012

CAL FIRE Camping Fire Safety Tips

 Sacramento – For many, the 4th of July signals the start of summer and time for fun family outings and
vacations, especially camping. 

However, with hot and dry conditions, summer is also the time for wildfires.
CAL FIRE would like to remind all campers and outdoor enthusiasts to keep these summer time safety tips
in mind while enjoying the great outdoors.
 
Fire safety plays an important role outdoors, especially when it comes to campfires and outdoor cooking. If  left unattended and not properly extinguished, campfires can produce a wildfire. 

Campfires can also be extremely dangerous for children:  Children should never be allowed to play around campfires or outdoor cooking appliances. Devastating burn injuries are all too common when these safety rules are not followed. 

In addition, it is important to use flammable liquids (lighter fluid, kerosene, propane) and related appliances safely. Just a little forethought could protect you and your family. 

CAL FIRE offers the following safety tips for outdoor recreation, cooking and camping: 

Obtain a campfire permit before starting any campfire. 
  • Use only approved and established campgrounds and campfire rings. 
  • Locate the campfire a safe distance away from tents, trees, or buildings. 
  • Clear the area around your campfire down to soil for 5 feet in all directions. 
  • Teach everyone “stop, drop, and roll”. 
  • Use electric or battery lights in RVs. 
  • When using a propane appliance, light a match before turning on the gas. 
  • Store flammable liquids away from your tent or RV, and away from open flames. 
  • Use flammable liquids only for their intended purpose. 
  • Never let children use or play with lighter fluid or have them start a campfire. 
  • Clear vegetation from around the tent for at least 3 feet. 
  • Keep lanterns and open flames outside of the tent. 
  • Completely extinguish fires, and turn off all lanterns and stoves, before going to bed. 
When it comes to firewood, don’t forget to buy it where you burn it. By burning firewood where you buy
it, you can eliminate the chance of spreading nonnative pests and diseases from one area to another. This is
an important step in preserving and protecting our natural resources.

Have a safe summer and prevent fires and injuries to your family.

For more camping safety and campfire tips, visit: www.fire.ca.gov.

California Fire News 2012 
-

Obama: "Employ All Resources to Fight Colorado Wildfires"


WASHINGTON, June 30, 2012 - As President Barack Obama thanked firefighters and volunteers, and met with impacted families in wildfire-devastated areas in and around Colorado Springs, Colo., yesterday, he also vowed to marshal all federal resources -- including military -- to combat the fires.


Click photo for screen-resolution image
Air Force Senior Airman Dustin Johannsen and Senior Airman Barry Logan pull a flame retardant filler hose from a Modular Airborne Fire Fighting System-equipped C-130 aircraft at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., June 29, 2012. The airmen are part of the interagency mission to fight devastating wildfires in Colorado. MAFFS-equipped aircraft are capable of carrying 3,000 gallons of flame retardant and can disperse it in five seconds. U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Thomas J. Doscher
 

(Click photo for screen-resolution image);high-resolution image available.
"We're going to continue to make sure that the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Forest Service, our military and National Guard and all the resources that we have available at the federal level are brought to bear in fighting this fire," Obama said today in his weekly video address to the nation. He recorded this week's address during his Colorado visit.

The federal government has marshaled thousands of firefighters, hundreds of fire engines, and more than 100 aircraft, including 19 air tankers, to support firefighting efforts in a number of Western states including Colorado, White House officials noted.

Meanwhile, four Department of Defense C-130 aircraft equipped with U.S. Forest Service Modular Airborne Fire Fighting Systems and under the command and control of U.S. Northern Command are assisting in the efforts to control fires in the Rocky Mountain region at the request of the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho, according to a Northcom news release issued today.

Northcom, based at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., partners with other agencies to conduct homeland defense, civil support and security cooperation to defend and secure the United States and its interests.

Additional Resources Deployed: 
Four additional MAFFS-equipped aircraft will be arriving later today to assist with firefighting efforts within the Rocky Mountain region, the Northcom release said.

As of early today, DOD aircraft have flown the following wildfire fighting missions in Colorado:

-- Waldo Canyon Fire, near Colorado Springs, Colo.: Fifty air drops, employing approximately 133,500 gallons of flame retardant;

-- Flagstaff Fire, near Boulder, Colo.,: Five air drops, employing about 13,200 gallons of flame retardant; and

-- Arapahoe National Forrest Fire, Colo.,: Six air drops, employing approximately 13,250 gallons of flame retardant.

Military units that conducted those missions are the 302nd Airlift Wing, Air Force Reserve, Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., and the Wyoming Air National Guard's 153rd Airlift Wing based in Cheyenne. Both units are currently flying missions out of Peterson Air Force Base, Colo.

The California Air National Guard's 146th Airlift Wing, from Channel Islands, and the North Carolina Air National Guard's 145th Airlift Wing, from Charlotte, will soon join the 153rd and the 302nd, military officials said.

This is the first time since 2008 that all eight military aircraft have been activated at one time, said Air Force Col. Jerry Champlin, 153rd Air Expeditionary Group commander.

In that year, the aircraft were stationed at McClellan Airpark in Sacramento, Calif., to fight fires in that state. Champlin, a member of the Wyoming Air National Guard, has tactical control over the MAFFS aircraft.

Although all eight C-130s will operate from Peterson Air Force Base for now, where they will drop fire retardant depends on the daily situation in the region, officials said. The U.S. Forest Service also may choose to base one or more aircraft in other operating areas.

Related Sites:
U.S. Northern Command
National Interagency Fire Center
U.S. Northern Command News Release
President's Weekly Address
Related Articles:
Commander to Oversee Colorado Wildfire Response
More Firefighting Aircraft Activated for Colorado Effort
Panetta Commends Jacoby for Northcom Fire Assistance
Northcom Continues Fire Suppression Efforts
Air Force Reserve Crews Join Fight Against Colorado Fires
Guard Wing Activates to Aid Firefighting Effort

-

USFS: Four more MAFFS activated in Rocky Mountain region.


 More Military Firefighting Aircraft Activated for Colorado Effort

CHEYENNE, Wyo., June 29, 2012 – Beginning tomorrow, eight military C-130 aircraft, each equipped with the U.S. Forest Service’s Modular Airborne Fire Fighting System, will be operating out of Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., to assist with firefighting efforts in the Rocky Mountain region.
Click photo for screen-resolution image
A C-130 from the Wyoming Air National Guard’s 153rd Airlift Wing uses the Modular Airborne Fire Fighting System to drop flame retardant on the Waldo Canyon Fire in Colorado Springs, Colo., June 27, 2012. U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Stephany D. Richards
  

(Click photo for screen-resolution image);high-resolution image available.
Two MAFFS-equipped C-130s from the Wyoming Air National Guard’s 153rd Airlift Wing and Air Force Reserve Command’s 302nd Airlift Wing have been working out of Peterson Air Force Base, located in Colorado Springs, Colo., since June 25.
Yesterday, the U.S. Forest Service requested that the remaining four MAFFS units be activated for the Rocky Mountain region. U.S. Northern Command, the Defense Department organization responsible for providing civil support, approved the request and agreed to activate the units late last night.
The California Air National Guard’s 146th Airlift Wing, from Channel Islands, and the North Carolina Air National Guard’s 145th Airlift Wing, from Charlotte, will join the 153rd and the 302nd.
This is the first time since 2008 that all eight military aircraft have been activated at one time, said Air Force Col. Jerry Champlin, 153rd Air Expeditionary Group commander. In that year, the aircraft were stationed at McClellan Airpark in Sacramento, Calif., to fight fires in that state.
Champlin, a member of the Wyoming Air National Guard, has tactical control over the MAFFS aircraft.
Although all eight C-130s will operate from Peterson Air Force Base for now, where they will drop fire retardant depends on the daily situation in the region, officials said. The U.S. Forest Service also may choose to base one or more aircraft in other operating areas.
“They are assigned to fires on a priority basis for each day,” said Scott Fisher, with the U.S. Forest Service. “Air tankers may also be reassigned during the day, based on a shift in priority for the Rocky Mountain coordination center.”
During the first five days of the military’s activation, the four MAFFS-equipped C-130s have dropped 138,398 gallons of fire retardant on two fires in Colorado: the Waldo Canyon Fire, near Colorado Springs, and the Flagstaff Fire, near Boulder.
The C-130s are aiding the effort through a joint Defense Department and U.S. Forest Service program designed to provide additional aerial firefighting resources when commercial and private air tankers are no longer able to meet the Forest Service’s needs.
MAFFS is a self-contained aerial firefighting system owned by the Forest Service that can discharge 3,000 gallons of water or fire retardant in less than five seconds, covering an area one-quarter of a mile long by 100 feet wide. Once the load is discharged, it can be refilled in less than 12 minutes.
 
Related Articles:
Panetta Commends Jacoby for Northcom Fire Assistance 
Northcom Continues Fire Suppression Efforts 
Air Force Reserve Crews Join Fight Against Colorado Fires 
Guard Wing Activates to Aid Firefighting Effort

-

National Guard Commander to Oversee Colorado Wildfire Response



Commander to Oversee Colorado Wildfire Response

By Jim Greenhill
National Guard Bureau


ARLINGTON, Va., June 29, 2012 - A National Guard dual-status commander has been recently appointed to support wildfire response and relief efforts in Colorado, according to Defense Department and National Guard officials.

Air Force Col. Peter J. Byrne -- director of the joint staff, Joint Force Headquarters-Colorado -- was selected by Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper in agreement with Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta, the Colorado National Guard reported.

"The dual-status commander will coordinate military firefighting efforts in the state," Hickenlooper said. "This commander operates as the liaison to make sure that we can take federal assets and airmen, soldiers, bulldozers, helicopters, Modular Airborne Firefighting Systems aircraft and get whatever tool we need."

Byrne, who is a Colorado resident, will work with fire incident commanders.

When agreed upon by the secretary of defense and the governor of an affected state, dual-status commanders can direct both federal active duty forces and state National Guard forces in response to domestic incidents, Defense Department officials said.

The unity of effort is intended to foster greater cooperation among federal and state military assets during a disaster.

The dual-status commander concept was most recently used in support of the NATO Summit in Chicago in May.

Byrne is a command pilot with more than 2,500 military flying hours and more than 145 combat hours, officials said. He was commissioned in 1984 and joined the Colorado Air National Guard in 1991.

"Working hand in hand with active duty forces is something the National Guard has performed seamlessly for more than 10 years in overseas missions," Byrne said. "Though the circumstances are tragic, bringing this experience of partnership to help friends, family and neighbors is a rewarding and natural extension of this valuable relationship."

According to Defense Department officials:

The nation's governors led the creation of this new opportunity for collaboration. Dual-status commanders ensure that state and federal military forces work together effectively together when states request federal forces. Through this improved partnership, military forces responding to the wildfires will be better able to avoid duplication of effort and support the needs of the incident and the American people.

The dual-status commander concept was codified in 2011, with 10 USC - 12304 as the usual and customary command and control arrangement for missions involving the simultaneous deployment of active duty, Reserve and National Guard forces in support of civilian authorities during major disasters and other emergencies.

 Related Sites:

National Guard Bureau

-

Memo: Personal use of fireworks will not be allowed on Federal lands



Federal Wildland Fire-Fighting Agencies Further Strengthen
Preparedness, Prevention in Advance of July 4th Holiday

WASHINGTON, June 30, 2012 – To further address the severity of current wildland fire activity across the western states,Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack have directed federal land managers to take additional measures to help reduce the risks of new wildfires, ensure the highest possible level of coordination among federal land management agencies, and continue to prioritize safety for firefighters and communities.

“As we continue our aggressive response to wildfires across the West, we must continue to do all we can to support our firefighters, first responders, and their families,” said Salazar. “Protecting human life and ensuring public safety is and will remain our top priority, and these measures will help us minimize the risks of new wildfires on America’s public lands. As we move into the 4thof July holiday under difficult wildfire conditions, let’s use this opportunity to thank the men and women fighting to keep our citizens safe, and remember to take easy steps to prevent and prepare for wildfires by visiting www.nifc.gov.”

Building on existing federal and state policies designed to decrease the likelihood of accidental fires, the joint memorandum directs federal land managers to prohibit the personal use of fireworks on lands managed by the Department of the Interior and the Department of Agriculture in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming until July 8, 2012. These local managers will also enforce additional fire restrictions or public land closures as appropriate for the 4th of July holiday and heighten law enforcement and fire prevention patrols in critical areas to ensure that all applicable restrictions are enforced. Many states, such as Colorado and Wyoming, have also put in place new restrictions on the use of fires and fireworks during this time.

"As our country celebrates its independence, the aggressive wildland fire fight continues," Vilsack said. "I want to thank the thousands of brave men and women on the front lines who are battling these fires under extremely difficult conditions, and protecting homes, communities, and cultural and economic resources. We ask our citizens to be extra cautious while following open flame guidelines and to review the fire prevention guidance at www.nifc.gov."

Additional measures include prohibiting new prescribed fires in geographic areas where Preparedness Level is at 4 or 5 – which currently includes the Rocky Mountain Area, Eastern Great Basin Area, and Southwest Area – and requiring regional or state level approval to initiate any new prescribed fire in all other geographic areas. Each Preparedness Level has specific management directions. As the Preparedness Levels rise, more federal and state employees become available for fire mobilization if needed.

Agencies and bureaus are asked to review their procedures to ensure that the safety of firefighters and the public continue to be the highest priority at every level of the decision-making process during fire suppression.  These measures will remain in effect until the National Multi-Agency Coordinating group determines a national Preparedness Level 3 or below. On June 27th, NMAC raised the preparedness level to 4, on a scale of 1-5. 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of the Interior, in partnerships with states and local agencies, have developed a cohesive strategy to respond to the increase in wildfires in recent years by focusing on:

-          Restoring and maintaining resilient landscapes. Through forest and rangeland restoration activities such as mechanical thinning and controlled burns, officials can make forests and rangelands healthier and less susceptible to catastrophic fire.

-          Creating fire-adapted communities. The Forest Service, the Department of the Interior and their partners are working with communities to reduce fire hazards around houses to make them more resistant to wildfire threats.

-          Responding to Wildfires. This element considers the full spectrum of fire management activities and recognizes the differences in missions among local, state, tribal and Federal agencies.

On average, the USDA Forest Service and the Department of the Interior bureaus respond to about 16,500 wildfires per year that occur on land under their jurisdiction and assist state and local agencies in responding to a significant number of the approximately 60,000 wildfires per year that occur on land under their jurisdiction. Federal firefighters, aircraft, and ground equipment are strategically assigned to parts of the country as the fire season shifts across the nation. Firefighting experts will continuously monitor conditions and move these assets as necessary to be best positioned and increase initial response capabilities.

Federal land managers are also helping communities prepare for wildfire. Federal partnerships with state, tribal and local agencies strengthen preparedness programs Firewise and Ready Set Go! that help families and communities prepare for and survive wildfire. You can also visit FEMA's Ready.gov to learn more about steps you and your family can take now to be prepared for an emergency.

The full text of the joint memorandum is below:

Memorandum

To:                   Chief, U.S. Forest Service
Director, Bureau of Land Management
Director, Bureau of Indian Affairs
Director, National Park Service
Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Commissioner, Bureau of Reclamation

From:               Secretary of the Interior
                        Ken Salazar

Secretary of Agriculture
Thomas J. Vilsack

As we continue our aggressive response to wildfires in the West, the President has made clear that we must do all we can to protect human life and ensure the safety of communities that are affected.

To fulfill this commitment, the Department of Agriculture’s Forest Service, the Department of the Interior, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency are deploying incident command teams, crews, engines, helicopters, tankers, and other resources through the National Interagency Fire Center to support local, state, and tribal partners in our coordinated response to wildfires.

As we maintain an aggressive posture in our response to wildfires, it is important to recognize the dangers that this year’s wildfire season poses. Periods of critical fire weather have already produced extreme, erratic fire behavior on several fires. Insect infestation, diseased trees, dense vegetation, and dry conditions in the western United States are expected to continue to exacerbate the weather conditions and create challenges for our firefighters through the summer. Recognizing the severity of current fire activity, resource commitments, and predicted conditions, the National Multi-Agency Coordinating group (NMAC) at the National Interagency Fire Center has raised our national Preparedness Level from Preparedness Level 3 (PL3) to Preparedness Level 4 (PL4). 

Given the challenges that this wildfire season poses, we believe that additional measures are warranted to reduce the risks of new wildfires, ensure the highest possible level of coordination among Federal land management agencies, and enhance safety for firefighters and communities. We therefore are implementing the following measures, which will remain in effect until NMAC determines that we may assume national PL3 or below:

Review procedures and take any additional appropriate measures to ensure that the safety of firefighters and the public continue to be the highest priority at every level of the decision-making process during fire suppression. 

-          Do not initiate new prescribed fires in geographic areas at PL 4 or PL 5. In all other geographic areas, to initiate a new prescribed fire the implementing Agency or Bureau must receive approval by their respective leadership at the Regional or State level.

In light of the current wildfire situation, we must further heighten our vigilance around the
Fourth of July holiday. The following measures will remain in place until July 8, 2012:

-          Local managers must ensure that personal use of fireworks will not be allowed on public lands managed by the Department of the Interior and the Department of Agriculture in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.  Any exception to the prohibition on personal use of fireworks must receive approval from the agency’s leadership at the state or bureau level. Commercial, professional, and municipal fireworks displays may proceed with approval of the local manager after consultation and coordination with appropriate local authorities.  On public lands managed by the Department of the Interior and the Department of Agriculture in all other states, any use of fireworks must comply with any applicable policy of the land management unit, state, tribe, or local government.

-          Local managers are to coordinate with other interagency partners to determine whether any additional fire restrictions or closures are appropriate for the Fourth of July holiday.

-          Local managers are to heighten law enforcement and fire prevention patrols in critical areas of concern to ensure that all applicable restrictions are enforced.

No directive in this memorandum limits your authority to adopt and enforce more restrictive measures if you find that they are warranted or if they have been or may be established by state, local, or tribal authorities where the public land unit is located.

Finally, as we confront this challenging wildfire season, it is important that we do all we can to support our firefighters, first responders, and their families.  The thousands of men and women who are responding to wildfires are working under difficult and dangerous conditions to protect communities and resources for our Nation.  We must honor their service, continue to provide them the resources they need, and guard their safety.

-

Friday, June 29, 2012

American Heroes Air Show - 9 AM to 4 PM on Saturday, June 30


We welcome you to join members of the Los Angeles Fire Department and their families at the nation's premier (and yes, free!) public safety helicopter air show from 9 AM to 4 PM on Saturday, June 30, 2012 in Los Angeles.
American Heroes Airshow. Click to learn more...

The American Heroes Air Show is a family event at the Hansen Dam Recreation and Sports Complex in the northeast San Fernando Valley

And yes, you heard correctly - admission & parking are FREE!

Guests of all ages will get an up-close look at helicopters from local, regional, state and federal public safety and military units with static displays, flight demonstrations and mission briefings. Make sure to bring a camera!

For complete information, including a map with directions to the event site and special shuttle service, please visit:



www.heroes-airshow.com/losangeles

-

LODD: Alameda County Firefighter Hollis Franks

Alameda County Firefighters Assocation, IAFF Local 55, is saddened to announce the line-of-duty death of Alameda County Firefighter Hollis Franks.


On June 23rd, following a brief but valiant battle with job-related lung cancer, Brother Franks passed away at his home in Livermore with family and members of ACFD/IAFF-L55 at his side.
Brother Franks was born on October 24, 1946.  Hollis was a valued member of the Alameda County Fire Department and a vital member of Fire Station 8 (College Avenue, Livermore) his entire career. During his 40-year fire service career he received numerous unit citations including the California State Firefighter Medal of Valor.
Hollis’ commitment was not limited to his community, but also his country. In 2012, he retired from the military with 33 years of service. During his years in the Army, Hollis earned numerous commendations including the Bronze Star Medal with "V" Device for actions on April 5, 1968, the Bronze Star Medal with "V" Device (1st Oak Leaf Cluster) for his actions on September18, 1968, and the Purple Heart for his wounds received during battle, August13, 1968. These three awards were for acts of heroism in Vietnam.

Memorial Service
Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012
Time: 10:00am. (Family Greeting will begin at 9:00am.)

Apparatus Procession

Following the memorial service a procession of fire apparatus, military vehicles and classic automobiles will follow the hearse fire engine and family to Memory Garden Cemetery in Livermore for a military burial.
Parking Instructions: Fire Apparatus attending should park along the north side of Finlay Way entering from Madison Avenue.
Military vehicles should be parked on the east side of Hillcrest Avenue between finlay and Guilford Avenue.
Classic automobile should be parked along the south side of Devon Place beginning at Hillcrest Avenue.
Church parking is for private vehicles of family and friends.
Reception

Following internment, a reception for all uniformed personnel will be held at Terra Mia Restaurant, 4040 East Ave. Livermore 94550, from 12:30 to 3:00PM.
Condolences

Condolences to Brother Hollis' wife Mary and his family can be sent via Local 55
C/O Alameda County Firefighters Local 55
369 15th Street
Oakland, CA 94612

-

Thursday, June 28, 2012

CAL FIRE Prescribed burn smoke will be visible Placer, Yuba, Nevada Counties

 CAL FIRE Prescribed burn smoke will be visible throughout Placer, Yuba, Nevada Counties

Smoke: Placer, Yuba and Nevada county residents should plumes of smoke today as a prescribed burn that started at 10 a.m. continues through the evening. Smoke will be visible from Interstate 80, Highway 49, Auburn, Foresthill and the surrounding areas, according to Cal Fire.

Where: The burn is occurring underneath the Middle Fork American River Canyon bridge, about a mile northeast of Auburn. The Lake Clementine Trail is also closed as part of the burn.

Who: Fire engines, hand crews, bull dozers and a helicopter will be working to keep the fire within its lines and Cal Fire will continue to monitor the area in the next several days, according to a Cal Fire news release.

Read more here: http://blogs.sacbee.com/crime/archives/2012/06/prescribed-burn-smoke-will-be-visible-throughout-placer-yuba-nevada.html#storylink=cpy

-

CAL FIRE GREEN SHEET: Private Hire Bulldozer Rollover

GREEN SHEET

California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE)
Informational Summary Report of Serious CAL FIRE Injuries, Illnesses, Accidents and Near-Miss Incidents


Private Hire Bulldozer Rollover – Non Injury

Private Hire Bulldozer Rollover – Non Injury - Pond Incident 12-CA-MEU-003941                                                    
June 14th, 2012 Pond Incident 12-CA-MEU-003941

Pond Incident
12-CA-MEU-003941

Dozer Incident
CA-CNR - A Board of Review has not approved this Summary Report.  It is intended as a safety and 

training tool, an aid to preventing future occurrences, and to inform interested parties.  Because it 
is published on a short time frame, the information contained herein is subject to revision as 
further investigation is conducted and additional information is developed.

SUMMARY
The following information is a preliminary summary of a near miss dozer incident that involved 
a private operator in the Mendocino Unit. The dozer rolled over on a steep, heavily wooded slope 
in thick smoky conditions while cutting dozer line on the Pond Incident. 

CONDITIONS
Location: The incident occurred on the east side of Highway 101, two miles north of Laytonville. The 
physical address of the property where the accident occurred is near 184 Pond Road, in Mendocino County, California. 
Weather:
Temperature: 84 Degrees Fahrenheit
Relative Humidity: 25%
Winds: 12-15 MPH 
Fuel Type: Brush /Timber 
Loading: Fuel Model 5 and 8 (Manzanita and Needle Conifers)
Continuity: Contiguous fuels.
Topography: Heavily wooded, steep terrain.
Slope was estimated to be 88% at rollover site.
Fire Behavior:
Moderate Rate of Spread in ground fuels with occasional torching of Needle Conifers.
Significant short range spotting based on wind and receptive fuel beds.
Make and Model of Equipment:
2006 John Deere 750J
ICS Type II dozer

SEQUENCE OF EVENTS
The fire occurred in an area of steep slopes, heavy fuels in a Wildland Urban Interface/Intermix
setting. The fire was spotting in areas due to winds, steep slopes and receptive fuel beds.

As the dozer operator took action along the road, he observed the fire had extended below the
road at a bend.

The operator attempted to flank the fire and tie a dozer line in between the two
road segments.

The operator stated the visibility was very poor due to heavy smoke lying down
in the area.

The operator stated as he began to climb uphill to tie the line in, the slopes became
very steep.

Due to the steepness of the slope, the operator made three unsuccessful attempts to
connect the line to the upper portion of the road.

On his third attempt to connect the line, the operator encountered a log in his path. As the
operator attempted to move the log, his dozer slid perpendicular to the slope, reducing the dozer
maneuverability.

The operator then stated he attempted to make his way off the slope. As he
moved down the slope, he encountered a soft spot of soil which caused him to slide a short
distance downhill (approximately 10 feet).

The operator stated the slide caused his downhill tracks to settle on a loose root wad mass.

The operator said as he began to move the dozer the root wad mass acted like a fulcrum and flipped the dozer onto its side/top. The operator said he shut the dozer off and waited to ensure the dozer was done moving. Once he was confident it wasn’t moving any further, he released his seat belt and exited the dozer without any further incident.

INJURIES/DAMAGES
The equipment operator self extricated himself from the dozer and did not complain of any 
injuries.
The dozer has a bent grab handle on the right side of the cab. No other cosmetic damage was 
noted. The extent of the mechanical damage has yet to be determined.  

2006 John Deere 750J
ICS Type II dozer
  SAFETY ISSUES FOR REVIEW
• All firefighters need to continually weigh risk versus benefit in their strategy and tactics.
• Dozer Operators assigned to wildland incidents need to continually evaluate tactics and 
slopes when conducting direct or indirect line construction.
• Dozers should maintain constant communication with personnel on foot to assist in 
monitoring the slope and terrain.
• Hand crews, fire engine crews and other personnel on foot during fire line suppression 
efforts must remain aware of rolling rocks, debris, machinery and other hazards. 
-

San Francisco Giants Hosts Firefighter Appreciation Night


 See the San Francisco Giants take on the San Diego Padres and show your support for the California Fire Foundation at the Firefighter Appreciation Night at AT&T Park.
Monday, July 23, 2011 -- game time: 7:15 PM
AT&T Park
San Francisco, CA
The package includes a ticket to the Giants game in the Firefighter Appreciation section, access to the pre-game firefighter tailgate party in Seals Plaza from 5 PM to 7:15 PM and a collector's firefighter-themed Giants T-shirt. Firefighters will be honored in a pre-game ceremony and proceeds will benefit fire organizations including the California Fire Foundation.
Tickets must be purchased through THIS SPECIAL LINK in order to benefit the California Fire Foundation and the families of fallen firefighters.
Stay connected with California Fire Foundation for any additional information. 

-

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Colorado: POTUS Sends DOD NORTCOM Help

 Northcom Continues Fire Suppression Efforts
With Mobile Air Fire Fighting System (MAFFS) Deployment


PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo., June 27, 2012 - Four Defense Department C-130 aircraft equipped with U.S. Forest Service Modular Airborne Fire Fighting Systems and under the command and control of U.S. Northern Command are helping to put out fires in Colorado at the request of the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho.
A C-130 aircraft, equipped with a modular firefighting system, drops retardant on a section of the Waldo Canyon fire near Colorado Springs, Colo., June 26, 2012. Four of these aircraft, assigned to the Air Force's 302nd and 153rd airlift wings, are helping civil authorities as they combat the fire. The 302nd Airlift Wing is based on Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., and the 153rd Airlift Wing is part of the Wyoming Air National Guard. 
As of early this morning, DOD aircraft had completed 23 airdrops at the Waldo Canyon Fire near Colorado Springs, dropping about 59,900 gallons of retardant on the blaze. Five airdrops had released about 13,200 gallons of retardant on the Flagstaff Fire near Boulder.

The supporting units are the Air Force Reserve's 302nd Airlift Wing, based here, and the Wyoming Air National Guard's 153rd Airlift Wing, flying out of Boise International Airport in Idaho.

MAFFS is a self-contained aerial firefighting system that can discharge 3,000 gallons of water or fire retardant in less than five seconds, covering an area one-quarter of a mile long by 100 feet wide. Once the load is discharged, it can be refilled in less than 12 minutes.


California Fire News 2012
 
-

Twitter links

-
****REMINDER**** Every fire has the ability to be catastrophic. The wildland fire management environment has profoundly changed. Growing numbers of communities, across the nation, are experiencing longer fire seasons; more frequent, bigger, and more severe, fires are a real threat. Be careful with all campfires and equipment.
View blog top tags
---------------------
CLICK HERE TO GO BACK TO TOP OF CALIFORNIA FIRE NEWS HOME PAGE