Twitter Buttons

Friday, December 31, 2010

CAL FIRE NEWS: CAL FIRE Fills Key Leadership Positions #CaFire


 Sacramento – Chief Ken Pimlott, acting CAL FIRE director, announced the appointments to five key leadership positions for CAL FIRE this week.
The following chiefs will fill critical vacant positions managing CAL FIRE’s two regions and 21 operational units. The new appointments take effect on Monday, January 3, 2011.


  • Dale Hutchinson, Southern Region Chief
  • Bill Holmes, Northern Region Chief
  • Stan Craig, Assistant Southern Region Chief
  • Doug Wenham, Assistant Northern Region Chief
  • Clare Frank, Assistant Deputy Director, Cooperative Fire, Training and Safety Program
 "I can not recall a time when CAL FIRE has experienced such a significant turnover in key leadership positions at one time,” said CAL FIRE Director Ken Pimlott.
“Each of these individuals brings new depth and experience to an already strong leadership team that will guide the Department through the many challenges ahead."

Dale Hutchinson, Southern Region Chief

Chief Hutchinson, of Banning, has 30 years of experience in the fire service, and most recently served as the assistant region chief for the Southern Region where he managed operations, administration, and resource management for the 9 Southern Operational Units and 5 Contract Counties within the Southern Region.
  Hutchinson also served as the California Emergency Management Agency (Cal EMA) Fire and Rescue Branch Region Coordinator for Cal EMA Region 6 (Mono, Inyo, San Bernardino, Riverside, San Diego, and Imperial Counties).
 Prior to his assignment as the assistant region chief, he served as the unit chief of the Madera-Mariposa-Merced Unit where he managed all risk operations in the three counties.
 Chief Hutchinson has extensive experience in Cooperative Fire Protection Agreements and Contract County Administration from his 25 years working through the ranks from volunteer firefighter to deputy chief in the Riverside Unit.
 He has a diversified background in fire protection operations, administration, budgets, labor relations, volunteer firefighter programs, fire prevention, law enforcement, and pre-fire engineering.
 He served on CAL FIRE Incident Command Teams for 8 years, with his last position as Incident Commander. As the CAL FIRE Southern Region Chief, Hutchinson will oversee 9 Units from the Central Valley to the Mexico border.

Bill Holmes, Northern Region Chief

Chief Holmes, of Cameron Park, started his career with CAL FIRE as a seasonal firefighter in 1969 while attending college.
 He worked his way up through the ranks to the position of unit chief for the Amador-El Dorado Unit. Chief Holmes is a certified chief officer in CAL FIRE and with the State Fire Marshal. He is a qualified national incident commander, operations section chief and agency administrator having served on major incidents throughout California, Wyoming, Montana and Oregon.
 In 2007, Chief Holmes co-chaired the Branding Committee that developed and recommended the new CAL FIRE logo. As the CAL FIRE Northern Region Chief, Holmes will oversee 12 Units from the Oregon border to the Bay Area.

Stan Craig, Assistant Southern Region Chief

Chief Craig, of Coarsegold, began his career with CAL FIRE in Orange County in 1973.
He worked in the Orange Unit and the Riverside Unit before moving to the CAL FIRE Training Academy in Amador County. After working at the Training Academy, Chief Craig moved to the Madera- Mariposa-Merced Unit (MMU), where he spent the remainder of his first 31 years with the Department.
In MMU, he worked his way up from battalion chief all the way to unit chief before he retired in May 2004. In July of 2009, Chief Craig returned to state service and was appointed to the position of Management Services Staff Chief for the Southern Region.





Doug Wenham, Assistant Northern Region Chief

Chief Wenham, of Redding, began his career with CAL FIRE in 1982 as a seasonal firefighter in the Shasta-Trinity Unit (SHU). In 1988, after a stint with the City of Redding Fire Department, he returned to CAL FIRE and was appointed to a position as a Fire Apparatus Engineer in the Nevada-Yuba-Placer Unit (NEU). He worked in NEU in various assignments including fire captain and battalion chief. In 2000, he transferred back to SHU where he promoted to assistant chief in 2006, deputy chief in 2007 and to unit chief in January 2010. As the SHU unit chief Wenham also served as the Shasta County Fire Warden and the Shasta County Cal EMA Operational Area Coordinator. Chief Wenham is also a peace officer, has an AA Degree in fire science and served seven years on CAL FIRE Incident Command Teams, including as the Incident Commander on CAL FIRE Incident Command Team 1.

Clare Frank, Assistant Deputy Director, Cooperative Fire, Training and Safety Program

Chief Frank, of San Jose, has over 23 years of fire service experience. Prior to this appointment, Frank was the deputy chief of the Civil Cost Recovery Program, which recouped nearly $26 million in the past 24 months from parties who negligently caused fires. Chief Frank began her career as a seasonal fire fighter in the San Mateo-Santa Cruz (CZU) Unit in 1982. She has held a variety of field and management positions in the Department, working in training, fire prevention, administration, and operations. She also served as the Fire Chief for the City of Milpitas, a progressive, all-risk fire department in the San Francisco Bay Area.
Chief Frank is also an accomplished attorney who has practiced as a labor-employment lawyer, a California Deputy Attorney General, and a federal staff attorney for the U.S. District Court. Chief Frank holds an Associate of Science Degree in Fire Protection Technology, a Bachelors of Science Degree in Fire Administration, a Juris Doctorate from Santa Clara University, School

Source: Original CAL FIRE Press Release .pdf - Link

Thursday, December 30, 2010

Oakland: 2 Alarm Structure Fire Leaves Three Dead Including Hero

Three Dead, Two Injured In #Oakland Apartment Fire

Three people were killed and two others injured early Thursday after a two-alarm fire triggered by a jerry-rigged power source roared through a four-unit Oakland apartment house, authorities said.An Oakland fire dispatcher said the fire was reported at 1:55 a.m. in the apartment building located at 1756 82nd Avenue. Arriving units, found flames shooting out of one of the units and the residents of another unit outside with leg injuries suffered when they used a blanket to escape the fire but fell to the ground.
Firefighters quickly deployed to battle the flames but could not save a mother, her 3-year-old daughter and a male friend who were in the apartment on fire.
They were taken to Highland Hospital, where they were pronounced dead. They have not been identified.
A neighbor told KTVU that the deceased man had brought the woman's 7-year-old daughter out to safety but then raced back into the flames to rescue the other two.
Two residents of another unit – a 59-year-old Blanca Garcia and her 19-year-old daughter Jennifer Berrera -- were taken from the scene to the hospital for treatment of leg injuries suffered in their fall from the flames.
Fire officials said a family of four who were illegally living in another unit were able to escape unharmed and were being taken care by the Red Cross. A fourth resident of the building was not at home at the time of the early morning blaze.
Oakland Fire Battalion Chief Eleanor Bolin-Chew told KTVU that the blaze appeared to be sparked by extension cords being used to the power the second-floor unit. She said PG&E had shut off power to the unit earlier this month and the extension cords were being used to bring in electricity from another apartment.
The fire was brought under control at 2:21 a.m.
Fire officials said the deaths were Oakland's first fire fatalities of the year.

Source article: ktvu.com Link

ALCO: Castro Valley High Angle Rescue - Pregnant Cow

Pregnant Cow Rescued From Well In Castro Valley

The fire department was notified at 8:47 a.m. that a cow had fallen into a 12-foot well on a residential property at 6421 Sunnyslope Ave., off of East Castro Valley Boulevard near Interstate Highway 580, spokeswoman Aisha Knowles said.
Firefighters, sheriff's deputies and animal control officers responded, drained the water from the well and requested a crane from the county public works department, Knowles said.
When the crane arrived, a sheriff's deputy and a firefighter climbed down into the well, which Knowles said is about 10 feet wide, and attached ropes and a harness to the animal.
As the rescue was under way, one of her calves wandered over and "tried to come close to the well to see what was going on with his mother," Knowles said.
She was finally lifted to safety shortly before 11 a.m. A local veterinarian checked out the cow and determined that she was uninjured.
"She's currently grazing and eating breakfast," Knowles said.
The property owner was at the scene the entire time and was "overjoyed" when the cow was rescued, Knowles said.
A barrier has now been erected around the well.

Source article: ktvu.coml Posted: 12:18 pm PST December 30, 2010 - Link

Retired Bay Area firefighter hits Twin Pine Casino jackpot, wins millions

Image
From left, Tribal Council Treasurer Sally Peterson, Tribal Chair Carl Rivera, jackpot winner Dale Valentine, Tribal Council Secretary Pam Reyes-Gutierrez and Tribal Council Representative Tim Rivera on Tuesday, December 28, 2010. Photo by www.minennaphotography.com .

MIDDLETOWN, Calif. – A retired firefighter from San Leandro won big when he visited a local casino this week.

Dale Valentine was making one of his regular visits to Twin Pine Casino in Middletown on Tuesday when he hit a jackpot of approximately $8,430,301.44 on a statewide California Megabucks slot machine.

“Our tribe has been committed to providing great success in our community,” said Tribal Chairman Carl Rivera. “We are extremely excited with the new found fortune of Dale Valentine, one our loyal customers who frequents our gaming facility.”

Rivera said it's truly inspiring when a valued customer like Valentine wins a jackpot of this magnitude.

Valentine and his wife, who call Twin Pine their favorite casino, own a vacation home in Lake County and spend much of their time in the county.

“I’m glad I hit the jackpot, but I’m really glad it happened here,” Dale Valentine said.

Twin Pine officials reported that Valentine has been a loyal customer at the casino for 15 of the 16 years it has operated, and has hit a few smaller jackpots during that time.

The couple's plans for the money include putting some away in the bank, a large donation to hospice, learning how to ride a Harley Davidson motorcycle for him and for her a larger bathroom and closet.

Twin Pine Casino & Hotel is owned and operated by the Middletown Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California. The casino is located at 22223 Highway 29 at Rancheria Road, Middletown.
Visit the casino online at www.TwinPine.com .
Story source: lakeconews.com Link

#SAR: Alpine Meadows - Missing Snowboarder Search Continues

Update: 0900hrs #NoJoy Snowboarder has been located and is deceased...

Searchers spotted the body of Shawnte Marie Willis, 25, of Tahoma, from a helicopter, Placer County Sheriff's Capt. Jeff Ausnow said.

They were lowered down to Willis' body, which was in a tree well. Willis appears to have crashed while snowboarding although what caused her to die will not be known until an autopsy can be performed next week, Ausnow said.
#Search resumes for missing Alpine Meadows skier resumes -Snowboarder Shawnte Willis remains missing today in the Sierra backcountry. Willis was last seen snowboarding off the backside of Alpine Meadows ski resort at about 1:30 p.m. Tuesday.

Capt. Jeff Ausnow, commander of the Tahoe Placer County Sheriff's division, said the search resumed at 7 a.m. today with more than 40 cross-country skiers and snowshoers attempting to find the 25-year-old Tahoma woman. Clear skies and lower wind speeds will also allow the rescue team to use helicopters to search from the air, Ausnow said.

Location: Alpine Meadows Ski Resort Wolverine Bowl area near Lake Tahoe in Placer County.
Resources:  More than a dozen snowshoe and cross country skiers rescuers fought 35 inches of new snow in their ongoing search, Three choppers are scheduled to fly at different times throughout the day, he said. 
Weather: Search efforts both Tuesday and Wednesday were hampered by storms, wind and the danger from high avalanche conditions. The Blizzard conditions and deep snow prevented the use of snowmobiles, during the first day of searching, Five search crews fighting 120 mile-per-hour winds in whiteout conditions searched for the missing woman. - Placer County sheriff's spokesman said.
Missing Person: Known as a veteran athlete, she had several factors in her favor.
"She is known to be an intermediate-level snowboarder and she was dressed appropriately: she has a helmet, proper gear, warm clothing and so forth. She does know this area; she snowboards this area quite a bit so hopefully she is familiar with the terrain and hopefully she is trying to make her way back and will cross paths with the search teams," said Placer County Sheriff's Department Capt. Jeff Ausnow.
  Willis has a history of epilepsy, but her cousin, Don Hubbs said he is hopeful Willis may have used her snowboard to build a snow cave as shelter from the storm, The Sacramento Bee reported.
"That's what I'm thinking," Hubbs said. "She should know to dig a hole and hunker down."

Source Articles:
Auburn Journal Link
UPI - Link
Sac Bee - Link

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Roseville: Stop Releasing Roseville Mall Fire Dispatches KCRA #Fail

The City of Roseville is demanding that KCRA 3 stop revealing Roseville Fire Department radio transmissions from the day of the Westfield Galleria at Roseville mall inferno.  

"multiple sources within the firefighting community said the police department's actions and apparent lack of cooperation early in the incident may have allowed the fire to get out of control."

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- 'KCRA knows ... that neither the City of Roseville nor its fire department had authorized the disclosure of the audio recordings,' Roseville City Attorney Brita Bayless said in a 'cease-and-desist' request sent to KCRA 3 on Wednesday.

In its response, attorneys for KCRA 3 told Roseville city officials that the station's 'publications of these recordings is fully protected by the First Amendment' even though the city 'may be embarrassed by public disclosure of these recordings.'

The request from the City of Roseville comes after KCRA 3 released multiple radio transmissions regarding the intentional shutoff of the mall's sprinkler system during the Oct. 21 blaze.

The latest radio transmissions show the frustration firefighters dealt with as law enforcement officers did not immediately include them in the initial response to the fire. 'I have not seen PD yet to form that unified command,' Battalion Chief Kathy Finney is heard saying in one of the transmissions. However, after suspect Alexander Piggee was taken into custody, firefighters were still repeatedly denied access into the mall to fight the fire because of concerns of a possible explosive device inside.

Roseville police, speaking at a news conference on Friday, defended the decision to keep firefighters out for safety reasons.

However, multiple sources within the firefighting community said the police department's actions and apparent lack of cooperation early in the incident may have allowed the fire to get out of control.  

Related Document -- City Of Roseville's Letter To KCRA 3 
Related Document -- KCRA 3's Letter To City Of Roseville 
Original Story: - KCRA Sacramento

Thought: City of Roseville needs an new attorney that respects the bill of rights, common law, and the rights of the tax paying public to know!

IRON 44: NTSB SAFETY RECOMMENDATION - CARSON HELICOPTERS

#NTSB SAFETY RECOMMENDATION
National Transportation Safety Board
Washington, DC 20594


The National Transportation Safety Board recommends that the
Federal Aviation Administration:


Require that the hover performance charts published by
helicopter manufacturers reflect the true performance of the
helicopter in all conditions for which the charts are
applicable, including light and variable wind conditions.
(A-10-148)

Develop and implement a surveillance program specifically for
14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 operators with
aircraft that can operate both as public aircraft and as civil
aircraft to maintain continual oversight ensuring compliance
with 14 CFR Part 135 requirements. (A-10-149)

Take appropriate actions to clarify Federal Aviation
Administration (FAA) authority over public aircraft, as well
as identify and document where such oversight responsibilities
reside in the absence of FAA authority. (A-10-150)

Require the installation of fuel tanks that meet the
requirements of 14 Code of Federal Regulations 29.952 on S-61
helicopters that are used for passenger transport. (A-10-151)
Require that S-61 helicopters that are used for passenger
transport be equipped with passenger seats and seat mounting
structures that provide substantial improvement over the
requirements of Civil Air Regulations 7.260, such as complying
with portions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations 29.561 and
29.562. (A-10-152)

Require operators of transport-category helicopters to equip
all passenger seats with restraints that have an appropriate
release mechanism that can be released with minimal difficulty
under emergency conditions. (A-10-153)

Require that Advisory Circular 21-34 be used to evaluate all
shoulder harness retrofit installations and to determine that
the installations reduce the risk of occupant injury. (A-10-
154)

Require operators of Sikorsky S-61 helicopters with General
Electric model CT58-140 engines to install 10-micron airframe
fuel filters. (A-10-155)

Require Carson Helicopters, Inc., to put a conspicuous
notification on the title page of the Instructions for
Continuing Airworthiness that accompany its supplemental type
certificate for installing side-mounted seats indicating that
the installation does not provide enhanced occupant protection
over that provided by the originally installed seats and meets
Civil Air Regulations 7.260 standards. (A-10-156)

Require all applicants for supplemental type certificate (STC)
seat installations in any type of aircraft to put a
conspicuous notification on the title page of the Instructions
for Continuing Airworthiness that accompany the STC indicating
whether the installation provides enhanced occupant protection
over that provided by the originally installed seats and the
certification standard level met by the seating system. (A-10-
157)

Require supplemental type certificate (STC) applicants to
improve the crashworthiness design of the seating system,
such as complying with portions of 14 Code of Federal
Regulations 29.561 and 29.562, when granting STC approval
for older transport-category rotorcraft certificated to
Civil Air Regulations 7.260 standards. (A-10-158)

Also, the National Transportation Safety Board reiterates
the following previously issued recommendation to the
Federal Aviation Administration:

Do not permit exemptions or exceptions to the flight
recorder regulations that allow transport-category
rotorcraft to operate without flight recorders, and withdraw
the current exemptions and exceptions that allow transport-
category rotorcraft to operate without flight recorders. (A-
06-18)

Original Source Document: http://www.ntsb.gov/Recs/letters/2010/A-10-148-158.pdf
The complete recommendation letter is available on the Web
at the URL indicated above.
An archive of recommendation letters is available at
http://www.ntsb.gov/recs/letters/letters.htm
.

Monday, December 27, 2010

Stanislaus Regional 911 Center dispatchers blamed for response delay

Report blames 911 dispatchers for Oakdale fire mistake

OAKDALE — Officials have concluded that mistakes by two Stanislaus Regional 911 Center dispatchers were behind a several-minute delay in sending Oakdale firefighters to a house fire.
The fire occurred on California Avenue  (10-27-10) in Oakdale,
Two homes were involved.
Photo Credit:
Harvey Duncan
It took six minutes and 14 seconds to dispatch Oakdale firefighters to an Oct. 27 house fire, according to a recent report. Officials have said firefighters typically are dispatched in less than two minutes, and it's not unusual to dispatch them in less than a minute.

The delay did not make a difference for the vacant house that was on fire in the 200 block of California Avenue. It was destroyed and the cause has been ruled as arson.
But two neighboring homes sustained additional damage because firefighters were not promptly dispatched, according to the report of the incident recently issued by the city.

Oakdale police officers evacuated residents from nearby homes before firefighters arrived. Officials have said the only injury in the 1 a.m. blaze was to a firefighter who hurt his hand.

The dispatching errors occurred as follows:
  •  The first dispatcher did not verify the complete address before calling firefighters. She thought the California Avenue fire was in Modesto, not Oakdale, and dispatched Modesto firefighters to a nonexistent fire. There are California avenues in Modesto, Turlock and Oakdale. The report states this mistake caused a three minute and 14 second delay.
  • Once dispatchers realized the mistake, another dispatcher sent tones over the radio to Oakdale firefighters.
 The tones sound in the fire station and alert firefighters that they are about to be dispatched. But the call was dispatched on the wrong channel, and Oakdale firefighters did not hear it. They called the dispatch center, and the call was dispatched correctly. The report states this mistake caused a three-minute delay.

"No one is happy about how this call was handled," wrote Lucian Thomas, the 911 center director, in an e-mail, "not the involved dispatchers or the management of Stanislaus Regional 911. We try our best to be as accurate as possible so the appropriate emergency resources respond to where they are needed."

Thomas said the 911 center handles 450,000 to 500,000 calls annually, for law enforcement and fire agencies throughout the county except for Ceres police, Turlock police and fire, and Oakdale police, which have their own 911 dispatchers.

Emergency calls in Oakdale are routed to Oakdale police. A dispatcher there transfers 911 fire calls to the regional 911 center.

Thomas said he cannot recall another mistake of this magnitude at the dispatch center.
He said because it is an employer-employee matter and therefore confidential, he could not release the names of the two dispatchers or how they were disciplined. But he said in his e-mail that "after our investigation, appropriate disciplinary action was taken."

The review of the incident included developing procedures to improve communications between Oakdale police dispatchers and regional 911 center dispatchers.

For instance, Oakdale dispatchers now have a protocol to follow when they transfer a call to the regional 911 center in which they tell the dispatch center that the Oakdale Police Department is calling; the nature of the incident, such as a fire or car wreck; the address of the incident, including the cross street; and whether Oakdale police are responding.

Officials said on the California Avenue fire, the Oakdale dispatcher made a "blind transfer" on the initial 911 call to the regional dispatch center and did not give the center any information. But Thomas said that does not in any way lessen the fault of his dispatchers.

Officials said the protocol provides an extra safeguard when Oakdale dispatchers transfer calls to the regional dispatch center.

Oakdale fire and regional dispatch center officials also recently met with California Avenue residents to review the results of their investigation.

Modesto Fire Department investigator Ken White said the fire caused $150,000 damage to the destroyed home, $75,000 to one nearby home and $5,000 to another.

He said investigators believe the people who set this fire may be responsible for at least one other incident of arson. Oakdale contracts with the Modesto Fire Department for fire investigation work.

Read more: http://www.modbee.com/2010/12/25/1486206/report-blames-911-dispatchers.html#ixzz19Lk7evbV

Merced Fire Chief retires after 28 years as Chief

MERCED — Ken Mitten's first day on the job in 1965 was nothing short of a trial by fire, pun intended.
As a 22-year-old rookie at the Whittier Fire Department in Southern California, Mitten was new to the business of fighting fires. Regardless, when the station bell rang that afternoon, he was dispatched to a major blaze at three buildings in downtown Whittier.
Despite the many fires Mitten's seen over the years, he'll never forget the first one.
"The next morning, the Los Angeles Times had my picture, holding a hose, saying 'new fireman gets oriented,' he said, while laughing.
On Sunday, Mitten closed the final chapter on his career as a fireman, retiring as Merced's fire chief.
Of those years, the 67-year-old Mitten served 44 as a firefighter in Merced, and 28 as fire chief, having been promoted in 1982.
Among his major accomplishments, Mitten served for several years as the state's Region V Fire and Rescue Mutual Aid System coordinator. The mutual aid system's mission is to address major disasters in any part of the state. In addition to Merced, Region V includes Mariposa, Madera, Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Kern counties.
With Mitten's retirement, city officials will begin a search to find a permanent replacement.
Fire Division Chief Steve Raney will serve as interim chief.
City Manager John Bramble said Mitten's knowledge and expertise will be sorely missed.
Of Mitten's leadership style, Bramble said the chief never asked someone to do something he wasn't wiling to do himself.

Source: http://www.modbee.com  Article Link

Friday, December 24, 2010

Coachella Valley: More than 2,000 valley children have brighter #Christmas

Coachella Valley police, firefighters play Santa with holiday toy drives

Once Santa checked off his list of naughty and nice, Coachella Valley police officers helped deliver the toys.


A Desert Hot Springs firefighter carries a box of Christmas toys
from the firetruck for needy children into the
Desert Hot Springs Senior Center.

(Wade Byars, The Desert Sun)
More than 2,000 valley children will have Christmas gifts under the three this holiday because of toy drives conducted by fire and police departments.

The California Highway Patrol, which will continue collecting toys through tonight, estimates it will also deliver as many as 5,000 toys to nonprofit groups in the valley by the end of the month.

“This is by far the most memorable Christmas season that I've ever experienced in my career,” spokesman Officer John Quintero said. “It's something that you can't put an earthly tag on.”

With donations from residents across the valley, firefighters and police conducted their annual toy drives — and this year some added a special twist to their deliveries.

Santa and Mrs. Claus delivered 28 brand-new bicycles and helmets to children at a Palm Springs City Council meeting because of donations to the police department.

Deputies at the Riverside County Sheriff's Department in Palm Desert — who oversee police services in Indian Wells, Palm Desert and Rancho Mirage — took 43 children to Toys R Us. Each child was given $100 to buy bicycles, toys or video games.

Police there then used the remaining money to buy eight bicycles, drive around Palm Desert and Rancho Mirage and hand the bikes off to children without one.

Desert Hot Springs police officers paired up with more than 50 children for the department's first “Shop with a Cop” day. Those children were given a mini shopping spree at K-Mart. The department also hosted a toy give-away, when about 75 children selected gifts from nearly 300 donated toys.

The Indio station — where deputies oversee Coachella and La Quinta police services — raised more than $5,500 and also sent officers to shop alongside children.

Cathedral City Police Officer's Association raised enough money to buy $200 gift cards for 54 children.

The toy drives allow firefighters and police to serve the community in a different way than the rest of the year, said Ben Guitron, spokesman for Indio police, who helped coordinate toy donations for more than 1,000 children.

He said he hopes the toy drives offer compassion and hope to children who might otherwise go without — and to the officers, too.

“Throughout the year, we see so much need, and suffering, and sacrifices, and victims of crime,” Guitron said.

“We just see so much of the other side of life that it's nice we can see there is good and people do have the heart to care. We just have to stop and recognize it.”

How to help

California Highway Patrol will continue collecting donations for its holiday toy drive through the end of today, Christmas Eve.

New, unwrapped presents can be dropped off at the highway patrol office at 79650 Varner Road in Indio. It is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today.

Starbucks locations will also serve as drop-off sites. Several locations in the Coachella Valley reported their hours would be 5:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. today.
Information: (760) 772-8911

Source article: Link

Sonoma County: Graton Fire Department Selling Trees

Firefighters selling #Xmas trees

Heather O'Dell, manager of the Graton Fire Tree Farm,
bales a tree for a customer on Monday in Graton.

Credit: BETH SCHLANKER/ The Press Democrat
When the Graton Fire Protection District bought land for a new station, it inherited a Christmas tree farm as part of the deal.

“I don't think any of us would be running a tree farm until we bought this property and started talking to the county, and they told us the property had to stay in agriculture,” said Deputy Chief Bill Bullard.

Graton may be the only fire department with its own tree farm, said Heather O'Dell, who was hired by the department to maintain and manage the farm.

“It is very unusual and a huge opportunity. It is different and it goes with our county,” O'Dell said. “Sonoma County has always been very environmentally conscious.”

Four years ago, the fire district purchased the 9.2-acre Davis Tree Farm for $1.25 million as the site for its new fire station.

The land is on Highway 116 between Green Valley Road and Graton Road, which puts the station in the middle of the locations where firefighters have had to respond to calls for the past two years, Bullard said.

“It is the perfect location for us,” Bullard said.

The $3.52 million station is under construction and scheduled to open next spring.

As a condition of the use permit, six acres of the site, planted in redwoods, white fir, Douglas fir and white spruce, had to remain in agricultural use, Bullard said.

Shortly after buying the tree farm, the department decided to reopent it, even though it required maintenance and time and work to get the operation back into optimum shape, O'Dell said.

Some of the trees had Needle Cast, a disease that strikes conifers, which necessitated cutting out and burning the diseased trees.

Other trees were planted too close together and required thinning, O'Dell said.

O'Dell said the district will raise between 3,000 and 5,000 seedlings in a nursery next spring, which will be planted in the farm the following year.

As part of a fund-raiser, O'Dell said they are selling seedlings for $1, which entitles the buyer to put their name, memorial or other message on an aluminum tag to stay on the tree.

The first year the seedlings are planted in the farm, it will be like a treasure hunt for those trying to find their tree. Afterwards, buyers will will be able to watch their tree grow until it is harvested six to eight years later.

The tree farm is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Sunday.

Source Article: PressDemocrat.com - Link

Thursday, December 23, 2010

LODD: Sacramento City Fire Captain Terrence Gee

It is with deepest regret that Sacramento Firefighters Local 522 and the Sacramento City Fire Department announce the passing of Fire Captain Terrence Gee of occupational cancer.

He was 54 years old.

Brother Gee began his career in the fire service with Sacramento Fire Department in February 1985. He spent a significant portion of his career assigned to Station 57 where he worked with his dear friend, Captain Bob Kiehne. In December 2005, Brother Gee promoted to the rank of Fire Captain and was assigned to Fire Station 10, an engine and truck house, where he worked as the engine captain.
During the time, Brother Gee was assigned to Station 10, he also frequently assisted and covered as the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Captain, as well as assumed the position of alternate Public Information Officer. As the EMS Captain, Brother Gee was responsible for the fleet of fire paramedic ambulances, as well as the needs of the 22 paramedics and emergency technicians assigned to the units in service. In February 2010, Brother Gee transferred to Station 60 and worked as the engine captain prior to becoming ill.
In addition to his work with the Sacramento Fire Department, Brother Gee was an elected Member of the Board of Directors for the Florin Fire District. In that role, he guided the district through the merger with the American River Fire District in 1997. "Terry Gee was a tireless advocate for both the district and the residents it served. Without his leadership and perseverance, the merger between American River and Florin Fire Districts would not have occurred" said Rick Martinez, retired fire chief for both districts. Following that merger, Brother Gee continued to support the regionalization of the fire service which led to the creation of the Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District.
Brother Gee was surrounded by family at the time of his death. He is survived by his wife of twenty-five years, Nancy, his 22-year-old son, Samuel, his 20-year-old daughter, Amanda, and many family and friends.
Memorial Information
Viewing
When: Wednesday, December 29, 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Where: East Lawn Elk Grove; 9189 East Stockton Blvd., Elk Grove CA 95624-9509
Memorial
When: Thursday, December 30, 1:00 p.m.
Where: First Baptist Church of Elk Grove, 8939 East Stockton Blvd., Elk Grove CA 95624-9509
The family has requested that any donations go to:
Firefighters Burn Institute; 3101 Stockton Blvd., Sacramento, California, 95820 www.ffburn.org
or
Courage Be To You; 3031 Stanford Ranch Road, Suite 2, #433, Rocklin, CA 95765 www.c2bu.org

Monday, December 20, 2010

Floods: Tips for Preparing for a Flood, Evacuating, Cleaning up

#CaFlood
Monitor the radio or television for weather updates. Prepare to evacuate to a shelter or to a neighbor’s home if your home is damaged, or if you are instructed to do so by emergency personnel. Gather your emergency supply kit and stay tuned to local radio or TV stations for updates.

Tips for Preparing for a Flood
  • Contact your local county geologist or county planning department to find out if your home is located in a flash-flood-prone area or landslide-prone area.
  • Learn about your community’s emergency plans, warning signals, evacuation routes and locations of emergency shelters.
  • Plan and practice a flood evacuation route with your family.  Ask an out-of-state relative or friend to be the “family contact” in case your family is separated during a flood.  Make sure everyone in your family has their contact information.
  • Post emergency phone numbers at every phone.
  • Inform local authorities about any special needs, i.e., elderly or bedridden people or anyone with a disability.
  • Identify potential home hazards and know how to secure or protect them before the flood strikes.  Be prepared to turn off electrical power when there is standing water, fallen power lines or before you evacuate.  Turn off gas and water supplies before you evacuate.  Secure structurally unstable building materials.
  • Buy a fire extinguisher and make sure your family knows where it is and how to use it.
  • Buy and install sump pumps with back-up power.
  • Have a licensed electrician raise electric components (switches, sockets, circuit breakers and wiring) at least 12 inches above your home’s projected flood elevation.
  • For drains, toilets and other sewer connections, install backflow valves or plugs to prevent floodwaters from entering.
  • Anchor fuel tanks which can contaminate your basement if torn free.  An unanchored tank outside can be swept downstream and damage other houses.
During a Flood Watch or Warning
  • Turn off all utilities at the main power switch and close the main gas valve if evacuation appears necessary.
  • Have your immunization records handy or be aware of your last tetanus shot, in case you receive a puncture wound or a wound becomes contaminated during the flood.
  • Fill bathtubs, sink and plastic soda bottles with clean water.  Sanitize the sinks and tubs first by using bleach.  Rinse and fill with clean water.
  • Bring outdoor possessions, such as lawn furniture, grills and trash cans inside or tie them down securely.
  • Fill your vehicle’s gas tank and make sure the emergency kit for your car is ready.
  • If no vehicle is available, make arrangements with friends or family for transportation.
  • Listen for disaster sirens and warning signals.
  • Put livestock and family pets in a safe area.  Due to food and sanitation requirements, emergency shelters cannot accept animals.
  • Adjust the thermostat on refrigerators and freezers to the coolest possible temperature.
If You Are Ordered to Evacuate
You should never ignore an evacuation order.  Authorities will direct you to leave if you are in a low-lying area, or within the greatest potential path of the rising waters.  If a flood warning is issued for your area or you are directed by authorities to evacuate the area:
  • Take only essential items with you.
  • If you have time, turn off the gas, electricity and water.
  • Disconnect appliances to prevent electrical shock when power is restored.
  • Follow the designated evacuation routes and expect heavy traffic.
  • Do not attempt to drive or walk across creeks or flooded roads.
If You Are Ordered NOT to Evacuate
Flood Recovery - How to Avoid Illness
Always wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected before preparing or eating food, after toilet use, after participating in flood cleanup activities and after handling articles contaminated with flood water or sewage.  If you receive a puncture wound contaminated with feces, soil or saliva, ask a doctor or health department whether a tetanus booster is necessary.

How to Make Sure Your Food is Safe
Do not eat any food that may have come into contact with flood water.  For infants, use only pre-prepared canned baby formula that requires no added water, rather than powdered formulas prepared with treated water.  Thawed food can usually be eaten or refrozen if it is still “refrigerator cold,” or if it still contains ice crystals.  To be safe, remember, “when in doubt, throw it out.”  Discard any refrigerated or frozen food that has been at room temperature for two hours or more and any food that has an unusual odor, color or texture.

How to Make Sure Your Water is Safe
Listen for public announcements on the safety of the municipal water supply.  Flooded, private water wells will need to be tested and disinfected after flood waters recede.  Questions about testing should be directed to your local health department.

Safe water for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene includes bottled, boiled or treated water.  Your local health department can make specific recommendations for boiling or treating water in your area.  Remember these general rules concerning water for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene.
  • Do not use contaminated water to wash dishes, brush your teeth, wash and prepare food, wash your hands, make ice or make baby formula. You can use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer to wash your hands.
  • If you use bottled water, be sure it came from a safe source. If you do not know that the water came from a safe source, you should boil or treat it before you use it. Use only bottled, boiled or treated water until your supply is tested and found safe.
  • Boiling water, when practical, is the preferred way to kill harmful bacteria and parasites. Bringing water to a rolling boil for one minute will kill most organisms.
  • When boiling water is not practical, you can treat water with chlorine tablets, iodine tablets or unscented household chlorine bleach (5.25 percent sodium hypochlorite).
  • If you use chlorine tablets or iodine tablets, follow the directions that come with the tablets.
  • If you use household chlorine bleach, add 1/8 teaspoon (~0.75 mL) of bleach per gallon of water if the water is clear. For cloudy water, add ¼ teaspoon (~1.50 mL) of bleach per gallon. Mix the solution thoroughly and let it stand for about 30 minutes before using it.
Note: Treating water with chlorine tablets, iodine tablets or liquid bleach will not kill parasitic organisms.

 Use a bleach solution to rinse water containers before reusing them.  Use water storage tanks and other types of containers with caution.  For example, fire truck storage tanks and previously used cans or bottles may be contaminated with microbes or chemicals. 

How to Handle Animals and Mosquitoes
Many wild animals may be forced from their natural habitats by flooding, and many domestic animals may also be without homes after a flood.  Take care to avoid these animals.  Do not corner an animal.  If an animal must be removed, contact your local animal control authorities.  If you are bitten by any animal, seek immediate medical attention.  If you are bitten by a snake, first try to accurately identify the type of snake so that, if poisonous, the correct anti-venom may be administered.

Contact your local or state health and agricultural officials for state guidelines on disposal of dead animals.  Protect yourself from mosquitoes: use screens on dwellings, wear long-sleeved and long-legged clothing, and use insect repellents that contain DEET or Picaridin. 

How to Deal With Chemical Hazards
Be aware of potential chemical hazards you may encounter during flood recovery.  Flood waters may have buried or moved hazardous chemical containers of solvents or other industrial chemicals from their normal storage places.  If any propane tanks (whether 20-lb. tanks from a gas grill or household propane tanks) are discovered, do not attempt to move them yourself.  These represent a very real danger of fire or explosion, and if any are found, police or fire departments or your State Fire Marshal’s office should be contacted immediately.  Car batteries, even those in flood water, may still contain an electrical charge and should be removed with extreme caution by using insulated gloves.  Avoid coming in contact with any acid that may have spilled from a damaged car battery.

How to Deal with Electric and Gas Utilities
Electrical power and natural gas or propane tanks should be shut off to avoid fire, electrocution or explosions until it is safe to use them.  Use battery-powered flashlights and lanterns, rather than candles, gas lanterns or torches.  If you smell gas or suspect a leak, turn off the main gas valve, open all windows and leave the house immediately.  Notify the gas company or the police or fire departments or State Fire Marshal’s office, and do not turn on the lights or do anything that could cause a spark.  Avoid any downed power lines, particularly those in water.  All electrical equipment and appliances must be completely dry before using them.  You should have a certified electrician check these items if there is any question.  Also, remember not to operate any gas-powered equipment indoors.

How to Clean Up
Walls, hard-surfaced floors and many other household surfaces should be cleaned with soap and water and disinfected with a solution of 1 cup of bleach to five gallons of water.  Wash all linens and clothing in hot water, or dry clean them.  For items that cannot be washed or dry cleaned, such as mattresses and upholstered furniture, air dry them in the sun and then spray them thoroughly with a disinfectant.  Steam clean all carpeting.  If there has been a backflow of sewage into the house, wear rubber boots and waterproof gloves during cleanup.  Remove and discard contaminated household materials that cannot be disinfected, such as wall coverings, cloth, rugs and drywall.


Sierra Avalanche Danger is High on slopes greater than 35 degrees

 #CaWx Where: CONSIDERABLE avalanche danger on slopes greater than 35 degrees on all aspects below tree line and on easterly (SE/E/NE) aspects above tree line. MODERATE elsewhere.
  The Mt. Shasta Avalanche Center - US Forest Service

Update Monday, December 20, 7 am:  Temps cooled down last night and it dumped.  In the last 24 hours, 9-13 inches of snow has fallen in the surrounding mountains.  Winds have been steady from the WSW, averaging 22 and gusting to 42, loading mostly NE and E aspects above tree line.  Concerns continue with wind slabs above tree line and storm slabs below tree line.  should be a great powder day, but slopes 35 degrees and steeper below tree line will likely be touchy and northerly and easterly aspects above tree line will be loaded and touchy, especially for machines. 

The Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center 
Danger Rating: Extreme
http://esavalanche.org/advisory
Extreme avalanche danger exists for the Mammoth area. High Avalanche danger exists for all other areas in the forecast region. A great deal of new snow, up to 10', has fallen with strong winds over the last several days, and will continue to fall today. Widespread avalanche activity reported by Mammoth and June Mtn ski patrols, with most paths capable of avalanching doing so this am as result of control work. Avoid avalanche terrain, including areas UNDER steep slopes as well. Be careful underneath roofs with snow build up as well! Click here for full advisory.


Up to 10 feet of new snow has fallen over the past few days with very strong SW winds, including 2-3 feet of lower density snow fallen last night. Mammoth hasn't seen a storm like this since 1986. Temperatures have been very warm up to yesteday evening, with snow levels at times above 8000'. The resulting snow has been very dense. Another foot+ expected today, with diminished, yet still moderate winds gusting out of the SW into the 50s. Temperatures are expected to be MUCH cooler with a high near 20 above 9000'.
Backcountry observations have been extremely limited at this time due to the dangers and difficulties of skinning travel in this type of snow.
Mammoth Mtn ski patrol and June Mtn ski patrol have both reported very sensitive avalanche conditions over the past 3 days with large slides releasing and propagating large distances, mostly in upper storm snow layers. Wide range of results on Mammoth Mtn ranging from foot crowns, to many 3-4' crowns, to an 8 ft crown in the Upper Cliffs this morning. Numerous natural slides have been reported, and there are sure to have been many many more that no one has been able to see. Quick observations made near Panorama Dome yesterday revealed 2 meters of new snow over the past few days, and stability tests indicating very sensitive surface instabilities. Click here for more details.What has been seen in the backcountry up to yesteday however indicates that the lower layers of this storm have been settling relatively quickly with the previously warm air-mass. However with the quick addition of this great amount of snow weight, it may be possible for deeper instabilities that were less of a worry before to become reactive.

Bottom Line: Extreme avalanche danger exists for the Mammoth area. High Avalanche danger exists for all other areas in the forecast region. A great deal of new snow, up to 10' has fallen around Mammoth with strong winds over the last several days, and will continue to fall today. Widespread avalanche activity reported by Mammoth and June Mtn ski patrols, with most paths capable of avalanching doing so this am as result of control work. Avoid avalanche terrain, including areas UNDER steep slopes as well. Be careful underneath roofs with snow build up as well!

The Tahoe National Forest Sierra Avalanche Center 
http://www.sierraavalanchecenter.org/advisory
This avalanche advisory is provided through a partnership between the Tahoe National Forest and the Sierra Avalanche Center. This advisory covers the Central Sierra Nevada Mountains between Yuba Pass on the north and Ebbetts Pass on the south. This advisory applies only to backcountry areas outside established ski area boundaries. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. The information in this advisory is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.

Today's Avalanche Advisory:


December 20th, 2010 at 06:46 AM
Near and above treeline, avalanche danger is CONSIDERABLE on NW-N-NE-E-SE aspects, 35 degrees and steeper. Below treeline, avalanche danger is MODERATE in open areas on all aspects, 35 degrees and steeper.

Forecast Disscussion:
The storm system that has affected the forecast area since Friday is starting to taper off. Cold front passage occurred yesterday afternoon/evening decreasing air temperatures and snow level across the region. New snowfall amounts in the last 24 hours at 8,500' are 7 to 16 inches, bringing storm totals up to 29 to 49 inches with 8+ inches of rain water equivalent. Air temperatures this morning at 8,500' are in the upper teens with around 5 degrees of daytime warming expected. Ridgetop winds remain out of the southwest this morning and have decreased from gale force to moderate in speed. Winds are expected to further decrease in speed this afternoon. Snowfall will be much less organized today as a short wave passes through the area. This will produce snow showers with new snow accumulations highly varied by location. An additional 3 to 6 inches of new snow is expected to accumulate over most of the forecast area today with up to 12 inches forecast for the far southern portion of the forecast area (Alpine County).
Observations:
Yesterday on Silver Peak (Pole Creek area), evidence of a large recent natural avalanche was observed. The avalanche is believed to have occurred around 10:30am Sunday morning. The start zone was a convex wind loaded E aspect bowl above treeline at 8,350'. The crown was approximately 600' wide, 3' deep and the avalanche ran 1000 vertical feet. This avalanche was full clean out of the avalanche path and ran the full distance of the path (photos, more info). Below treeline at 7,500', ski cutting a convex test slope produced a small slab avalanche involving the top 6 to 8 inches of rain wetted new snow (photo, more info). Test pits were dug on this slope and a second location nearby in an area that was noted previously to have surface hoar up to 4 cm at the base of the storm snow. Both pits revealed no evidence of ongoing instability with this already collapsed surface hoar layer. Snow level had risen to around 7,700' by mid day in this area.
Avalanche Concern #1: Wind Slabs
The combination of new snow and wind over the past 24 hours is expected to have further enhanced existing slab formation in wind loaded areas. Natural slab avalanches remain possible today while human triggered slab avalanches remain likely near and above treeline on steep NW-N-NE-E-SE aspects. Most of the avalanche activity that occurs today is expected to involve new snow from the past 24 hours. However, large and destructive avalanches with snowpack failure deep within the recent storm snow remain possible.
Avalanche Concern #2: Loose snow avalanches

Cooling air temperatures since yesterday afternoon have placed lower density new snow on top of higher density new snow. In wind protected areas below treeline, this will limit slab formation and allow most snowpack failure to occur as loose snow avalanches (sluffs) involving the upper portion of the recent storm snow. Secondary terrain hazards such as cliffs, terrain traps, trees, and exposed rocks will drastically increase the consequences of becoming caught in a loose snow avalanche.

The bottom line:

Near and above treeline, avalanche danger is CONSIDERABLE on NW-N-NE-E-SE aspects, 35 degrees and steeper. Below treeline, avalanche danger is MODERATE in open areas on all aspects, 35 degrees and steeper.

Find your Avalanche Center n the United States - http://www.avalanche.org/

Be Prepared: Landslides and Mudslides - Information

Landslides and Mudslides

Landslides occur when masses of rock, earth or debris move down a slope.  Mudslides, also known as debris flows or mudflows, are a common type of fast-moving landslide that tends to flow in channels.

What Causes Landslides and Mudslides?
Landslides are caused by disturbances in the natural stability of a slope.  They can happen after heavy rains, droughts, earthquakes or volcanic eruptions.  Mudslides develop when water rapidly collects in the ground and results in a surge of water-soaked rock, earth and debris.  Mudslides usually begin on steep slopes and can be triggered by natural disasters.  Areas where wildfires or construction have destroyed vegetation on slopes are at high-risk landslides during and after heavy rains.

Health Threats from Landslides and Mudslides
In the United States, landslides and mudslides result in 25 to 50 deaths each year.  The health hazards associated with landslides and mudslides include:
  • Rapidly moving water and debris that can lead to trauma.
  • Broken electrical, water, gas and sewage lines that can result in injury or illness.
  • Disrupted roadways and railways that can endanger motorists and disrupt transport and access to health care.

What Areas Are at Risk?

Some areas are more likely to experience landslides or mudslides, including:
  • Areas where wildfires or construction have destroyed vegetation.
  • Areas where landslides have occurred before.
  • Steep slopes and areas at the bottom of slopes or canyons.
  • Slopes that have been altered for construction of buildings and roads.
  • Channels along a stream or river.
  • Areas where surface runoff is directed.
 Protect Yourself

Before Intense Storms and Rainfall

  • Assume that steep slopes and areas burned by wildfires are vulnerable to landslides and mudslides.
  • Learn whether landslides or mudslides have occurred previously in your area by contacting local authorities, a county geologist or the county planning department, state geological surveys or departments of natural resources or university departments of geology.
  • Contact local authorities about emergency and evacuation plans.
  • Develop emergency and evacuation plans for your family and business.
  • Develop an emergency communication plan in case family members are separated.
  • If you live in an area vulnerable to landslides, consider leaving it.
 During Intense Storms and Rainfall
  • Listen to the radio or watch TV for warnings about intense rainfall or for information and instructions from local officials.
  • Be aware of any sudden increase or decrease in water level on a stream or creek that might indicate debris flow upstream. A trickle of flowing mud may precede a larger flow.
  • Look for tilted trees, telephone poles, fences or walls, and for new holes or bare spots on hillsides.
  • Listen for rumbling sounds that might indicate an approaching landslide or mudslide.
  • Be alert when driving.  Roads may become blocked or closed due to collapsed pavement or debris.
  • If you see a landslide or mudslide starting, quickly move away from the path of the slide.  Getting out of the path of a mudslide is your best protection.  Move to the nearest high ground in a direction away from the path.  If rocks and debris are approaching, run for the nearest shelter and take cover (under a desk, table or other piece of sturdy furniture).
 After a Landslide or Mudslide
  • Stay away from the site.  Flooding or additional slides may occur after a landslide or mudslide.
  • Check for injured or trapped people near the affected area, if it is possible to do so without entering the path of the landslide or mudslide.
  • Listen to the radio or TV for emergency information.
  • Report broken utility lines to the appropriate authorities.
  • Consult a geotechnical expert (a registered professional engineer with soils engineering expertise) for advice on reducing additional landslide problems and risks.  Local authorities should be able to tell you how to contact a geotechnical expert.
Information adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Source article: Link

Sunday, December 19, 2010

NWS: Many New Rainfall Records Set In Southern California

#CaWx RECORD EVENT REPORT - NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE - LOS ANGELES/OXNARD CA
535 PM PST SUN DEC 19 2010
From Lone Pine Canyon and Summit Roads in Wrightwood. Lone Pine closed between Shhep Creek and Summit Roads.
Photo Credit:
Lone Pine Mud Flow by Nikki Garrett Metzger
MANY RECORD DAILY MAXIMUM RAINFALLS SET IN SOUTHWESTERN CA
  1. A RECORD RAINFALL OF 1.86 INCH(ES) WAS SET AT SANTA MARIA AIRPORT CA TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 0.95 SET IN 1984.
  2. A RECORD RAINFALL OF 1.63 INCH(ES) WAS SET AT LOS ANGELES AIRPORT TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 1.62 SET IN 1984.
  3. A RECORD RAINFALL OF 2.3 INCH(ES) WAS SET AT DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES (USC) CA TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 2.12 SET IN 1921.
  4. A RECORD RAINFALL OF 1.53 INCH(ES) WAS SET AT LONG BEACH AIRPORT CA TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 0.52 SET IN 1984.
  5. A RECORD RAINFALL OF 1.92 INCH(ES) WAS SET AT SANTA BARBARA AIRPORT CA TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 1.75 SET IN 1964.
  6. A RECORD RAINFALL OF 2.40 INCH(ES) WAS SET AT SAN LUIS OBISPO CAL POLY CA TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 1.37 SET IN 1970.
  7. A RECORD RAINFALL OF 3.20 INCH(ES) WAS SET AT SAN GABRIEL CA TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 1.90 SET IN 1970.
  8. A RECORD RAINFALL OF 3.45 INCH(ES) WAS SET AT PASADENA CA TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 1.50 SET IN 1987.
  9. A RECORD RAINFALL OF 2.87 INCH(ES) WAS SET AT UCLA CA TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 2.82 SET IN 1949.
Source: http://mesonet.agron.iastate.edu/p.php?pid=201012200128-KLOX-SXUS76-RERLOX
BILL/STUART

Saturday, December 18, 2010

NWS: FLASH FLOOD WATCH - BURN AREAS OF SANTA BARBARA COUNTY

#CAWX - #FLOOD WATCH - NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOS ANGELES/OXNARD CA
822 PM PST FRI DEC 17 2010
FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT FROM SATURDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH
SUNDAY EVENING...
FLASH FLOOD WATCH HAS BEEN ISSUED FOR THE RECENT BURN AREAS IN
SANTA BARBARA,VENTURA AND LOS ANGELES COUNTIES

 A PLUME OF VERY DEEP SUBTROPICAL MOISTURE ACROSS THE PACIFIC
OCEAN WILL MOVE ACROSS SOUTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA OVER THE NEXT
SEVERAL DAYS.
  THIS COMBINED WITH A SERIES OF STORM FRONTS WILL BRING COPIOUS AMOUNTS OF RAIN TO MUCH OF THE FORECAST AREA THROUGH SUNDAY EVENING.

THE HIGHEST RAINFALL TOTALS SHOULD OCCUR OVER THE SOUTH FACING FOOTHILL AND MOUNTAIN REGIONS OF SANTA BARBARA...VENTURA AND LOS ANGELES COUNTIES...WHERE UP TO 6 TO 10 INCHES OF RAIN COULD FALL.

DUE TO THE HIGH MOISTURE CONTENT THROUGH THE ATMOSPHERE...STEADY
RAIN SHOULD HELP GIVE A GOOD SOAKING TO THE BURN AREAS THROUGH
SATURDAY.

BY SATURDAY EVENING...RAINFALL INTENSITIES SHOULD INCREASE AND PERSIST THROUGH SUNDAY. THIS WILL BRING THE POSSIBILITY OF DANGEROUS DEBRIS FLOWS IN AND NEAR THE THE RECENT BURN AREAS...SUCH AS THE STATION...MORRIS...JESUSITA AND LA BREA BURN AREAS FROM 2009 AND THE CROWN BURN AREA FROM 2010.

RAIN SHOULD TAPER OFF BY EARLY MONDAY FOR A SHORT PERIOD...THEN
ANOTHER ROUND OF POSSIBLY MORE SIGNIFICANT RAIN COULD BRING MORE
DAMAGING WIDESPREAD FLASH FLOODING AND AREAL FLOODING TO PORTIONS
OF SOUTHWEST CALIFORNIA TUESDAY INTO WEDNESDAY. 

RAINFALL TOTALS THROUGH WEDNESDAY HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO BE SOME OF THE HIGHEST RAINFALL ACCUMULATIONS SEEN IN RECENT YEARS.

WHERE: CUYAMA VALLEY-SANTA BARBARA COUNTY SOUTH COAST- SANTA BARBARA COUNTY MOUNTAINS- INCLUDING THE CITIES OF CUYAMA, SANTA BARBARA, MONTECITO, CARPINTERIA, SAN MARCOS PASS, SAN RAFAEL WILDERNESS AREA...
DICK SMITH WILDERNESS AREA



* FLASH FLOODING AND DEBRIS FLOW WILL BE A THREAT IN AND BELOW THE
RECENT BURN AREAS.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS:
A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS THAT CONDITIONS MAY DEVELOP THAT LEAD
TO FLASH FLOODING. FLASH FLOODING IS A VERY DANGEROUS SITUATION.

RESIDENTS IN OR BELOW THE RECENTLY BURNED AREAS ARE URGED TO TAKE
THE STEPS NECESSARY TO PROTECT THEIR PROPERTY. PERSONS IN THE
WATCH AREA SHOULD REMAIN ALERT AND FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS OF
EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS OFFICIALS.

Twitter links

-
****REMINDER**** Every fire has the ability to be catastrophic. The wildland fire management environment has profoundly changed. Growing numbers of communities, across the nation, are experiencing longer fire seasons; more frequent, bigger, and more severe, fires are a real threat. Be careful with all campfires and equipment.
View blog top tags
---------------------
CLICK HERE TO GO BACK TO TOP OF CALIFORNIA FIRE NEWS HOME PAGE